Patriots, Traitors And Empires: The Story Of Korea’s Struggle For Freedom

You Are Invited to Two Book Launches by Stephen Gowans – Tuesday, May 15th, in Hamilton, Ontario

An Invite from the Hamilton Coalition to Stop The War, a Hamilton, Ontaaio area citizens organization

Posted May 11th, 2018 on Niagara At Large

Hamilton, Ontario – The Hamilton Coalition To Stop The War (HCSW) is proud to sponsor Stephen Gowans at two book launches in Hamilton, the first on Monday, May 14, at 7 pm at New Vision United Church, 24 Main Street West, Hamilton, and the second on Tuesday, May 15, at 12:30 pm at the McMaster University Student Centre, Room 220.

Gowans will deliver a lecture explaining how the current crisis came about and will outline a path to peace on the Korean Peninsula. A Q&A will follow, plus selling and autographing of the new book, which sells for $25.

Stephen Gowans is an independent political analyst whose principal interest is in who influences formulation of foreign policy in the United States. His writings, which appear on his What’s Left blog, have been reproduced widely in online and print media in many languages and have been cited in academic journals and other scholarly works. He is the author of the acclaimed Washington’s Long War on Syria (Baraka Books, 2017).

Author Stephen Gowans

There will be free admission to both events, which are wheelchair accessible.

About the Book

Patriots, Traitors and Empires: the story of Korea’s struggle for freedom is an account of modern Korean history, written from the point of view of those who fought to free Korea from the domination of foreign empires. It traces the history of Korea’s struggle for freedom from opposition to Japanese colonialism starting in 1905 to North Korea’s current efforts to deter the threat of invasion by the United States or anybody else by having nuclear weapons.

Koreans have been fighting a civil war since 1932, when Kim Il Sung, founder of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, along with other Korean patriots, launched a guerrilla war against Japanese colonial domination. Other Koreans, traitors to the cause of Korea’s freedom, including a future South Korean president, joined the side of Japan’s Empire, becoming officers in the Japanese army or enlisting in the hated colonial police force.

From early in the 20th century when Japan incorporated Korea into its burgeoning empire, Koreans have struggled against foreign domination, first by Japan then by the United States. Some protests were peaceful; others involved riots, insurrection and sustained guerrilla war. After the US engineered political partition of their country in 1945, the Koreans fought a conventional war, from 1950-1953. Three million gave their lives.

Examining the history of the Republic of Korea (South Korea), Gowans shows that it can be accurately qualified a “US puppet state” or even “a stationary US aircraft carrier.” Only when faced with virtually insurmountable military threat did the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) resort to nuclear weapons to ensure its defense.

Patriots, Traitors and Empires, The Story of Korea’s Struggle for Freedom is a much-needed antidote to the jingoist clamor spewing from all quarters whenever Korea is discussed.

The complete schedule of Gowans’ central Canadian book launches is attached.

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 “A politician thinks of the next election. A leader thinks of the next generation.” – Bernie Sanders

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