Two New Exhibitions Open At RiverBrink Art Museum On Saturday May 17th

News from Niagara, Ontario’s Riverbrink Art Museum

QUEENSTON (NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE) Ontario – RiverBrink Art Museum announces the opening of two new exhibitions “John Abrams: Land Mark Combine” and “Female Self-Representation and the Public Trust: Mary E. Wrinch and the AGW Collection,” organized and circulated by the Art Gallery of Windsor.

John Abrams, Land Mark Combine, 2000-2001, oil on canvas, detail, Collection of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery. Image courtesy of RiverBrink Art Musuem

John Abrams, Land Mark Combine, 2000-2001, oil on canvas, detail, Collection of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery. Image courtesy of RiverBrink Art Musuem

 “John Abrams: Land Mark Combine,” curated by Debra Antoncic (May 17th to October 26th 2014)

Land Mark Combine (2000 – 2001), on loan from The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, is a multi-panel installation of paintings depicting both natural and man-made landmarks. Niagara Falls taken from an elevated position is the central image, and this iconic landscape is paired with forty small landscapes. The individuality of each landmark is muted by the red underpainting visible throughout, a strategy that aligns the paintings with cinema and photography. As Abrams explains, “my project engages the language of painting as a way of interpreting the language of film, not dissimilar to the way a book is made into a film or a script is turned into living theatre.“ John Abrams was born in Montreal and is currently based in Toronto. A graduate of the MFA program at York University, his practice includes painting, sculpture, and filmmaking.  His work often references pop culture and mass media.

“Female Self-Representation and the Public Trust: Mary E. Wrinch and the AGW Collection,” organized and circulated by the Art Gallery of Windsor (May 17th 2014 to August 24th 2014)

Mary E. Wrinch, Sawmill, Dorset, c. 1936, Collection of the Art Gallery of Windsor. Image courtesy of Riverbrink Art Museum

Mary E. Wrinch, Sawmill, Dorset, c. 1936, Collection of the Art Gallery of Windsor. Image courtesy of Riverbrink Art Museum

Mary Evelyn Wrinch (1877-1969) was an important artist working in the Toronto area during the first half of the 20th century. An artist and educator who trained initially in the art of the miniature, she moved on to paint in oil on panel boards and on enlarged stretched canvases beginning in the 1910s, followed by printmaking in the 1920s. While exploring Wrinch’s multi-media art practice, this show focuses on the formation of her public collection representation at the Art Gallery of Windsor and the complex artist-couple dynamic following her marriage to prominent architect and artist George Reid.  As this exhibition explores, before attending to her own legacy in public art collections, she first found herself addressing Reid’s first wife Mary Hiester’s career followed by George Reid’s career.

This exhibition re-opens her practice for study and profiles the work of an important artist through the lens of artist-couple histories and gender analysis. This exhibition is generously supported by Sandra Lawrence and Charles Jackson

For information about the exhibitions, contact Debra Antoncic, Associate Curator (curator@riverbrink.org)

RiverBrink Art Museum is located at 116 Queenston Street, Queenston (Niagara-on-the-Lake) (on the Niagara Parkway halfway between Niagara Falls and “Old Town” Niagara-on-the-Lake). Free parking. Wheelchair accessible.

(NOW IT IS YOUR TURN. Niagara At Large encourages you to share your views on this post. A reminder that we only post comments by individuals who share their first and last name with them.)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s