Past Generations Were Green Before ‘Being Green’ Became A Light-Feathered, Baby Boomer Fad

 A  Note from Niagara At Large publisher Doug Draper Niagara At Large has received the following post from one of our many readers. We receive numerous posts, as you may imagine on , but this one kind of said it all as far as the phony “green movement” too many of our politically correct politicians and others are putting forth these days. They claim they support environmental protection or “green” projects when they don’t.

There are suburban neighbourhoods today that make hanging clothes out on a line against the law because some in the suburbs take offience to seeing someone else’s clothes hanging ona line to dry. Those who take offience ought to perhaps be sent off to an island of their own, and leave the rest of us who want to get away from consuming more electricity around drying clothes alone.

 Today’s political leaders and their enablers care about a greener economy? Except for possibly a handful of them, bullshit! I am old enough to remember talking to generations, now all but gone, who lived through the Great Depression and the Second World War who knew what it was like to have to conserve, recycle and reduce their consumption of natural resources and commercial goods. It is true that many people from that generation  – what former American news anchor Tom Brokaw dubbed “the greatest generation – were living through the worst depression on this continent and one of the world’s most destructive wars, so there were obvious reasons for conserving and living what some today might call a minimalist lifestyle.

 Yet just try and tell the pampered, self-indulged generation of baby boomers (and a good number of their children) who came up behind them that they should cut back on their hunger for goods that cost the earth more in terms of energy and other precious resources and see where you get. If we had any political leader who had the guts to stand up and say we should ration gasoline, as was done during the Second World War, because there isn’t much left and it is contributing to pollutants responsible for smog (a major agent of respiratory disease) and climate change, we would likely have more people rallying out in the streets right now than they do in the streets of Egypt. There would even be people who normally only interested in hockey fights and drinking beer who would join these rallies.

So this post below says something about the generation gap and the phoniness of some of those today who pretend to be in to the “green movement,” while at the same time driving gas-guzzling cars, buying jumbo homes in low-density suburbs, frequenting malls and strip malls paved over old orchards and cornfields, etc., etc.

can you imagine what cry babies most baby boomers would turn in to today if the government said let’s ration gas for the sake of conserving resources and cleaner air? Most of them would likely be rallying in the streets – screaming something like; ‘Don’t tell us we don’t have a right to guzzle as much gas as we want!’

Give it a read and consider sharing your views below, even though they may not seem all that politically correct for so many of the phony ‘green’ people around today, and  remembering that we only posts comments from individuals who dare to also share their first and last names. Being Green

 Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.

But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smartass young person…

We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to piss us off.

 

 Past Generations Were Green Before ‘Being Green’ Became A Fad

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.

But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smartass young person…

We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to piss us off.

 

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9 responses to “Past Generations Were Green Before ‘Being Green’ Became A Light-Feathered, Baby Boomer Fad

  1. Who wrote this lovely post? It’s a good reminder of how we did with much less, and brought back fond memories of those paper bag book covers-which we decorated with our pencil crayoned art. I also remembered the home made especially -folded newspaper hats, which could be made into bags for garbage in our upstairs and dry garbage down stairs.

    Like

  2. Linda McKellar

    Everything now is disposable. Planned obsolescence is in vogue.

    Like

  3. Will MacKenzie

    I enjoyed it the first time I read it …. and am enjoying reading it over again … and again!
    wdm

    Like

  4. I was born on a side of a hill in North Wales, our water was a spring, our stove was called a range,our kettle was cast iron and always boiling, no electric, so had oil lamps, no waste also very little money, Hitler had just taken over Poland, our radio was run off a glass type car battery charged at the local smithy, they got electric in 1948, after the war,we had moved to Liverpool England where most of my relatives lived, we recycled paper and jam jars nothing was ever wasted everybody did it, it was our patriotic duty.

    Like

  5. I also have enjoyed this article before. For a few, many of these ways are a way of life, a culture, a sub-culture if you like. Like using the backs of envelopes for shopping lists, or using curtains open at night and closed in the day for temperature control.
    Our seniors are a wealth of knowledge for the simplest things. Many youth are recognizing the value of these lessons.

    Visioning ‘the green thing’:
    A green economy that’s not a direction, it just is.
    All investments are sold with a carbon rating. Pension plans, banks all post their ratings for comparison.
    Infilling is for land previously built upon.
    It is illegal to knowingly damage the environment.
    Land ownership gains an overhaul.
    The ‘culture’ of a city or region is its ecological responsibility rating.
    Saving seeds is not included in ‘free’ trade talks.
    Governments are legally liable to put the long term security of residents first.
    Food is grown, accessed, processed, sold, and composted in each community.
    Access to water is a human right, universally, and without exception.

    Thanks again for sharing this column.

    Like

  6. Don’t forget all of our refillable glass bottles…..from milk to pop. I don’t think milk has tasted as good as it used to out of the glass bottles. Now it has that plasticky after taste to it.

    Like

  7. people wanting cheaper more convenient products drove industry to making disposable products. people won’t pay an extra dollar for milk in a bottle and have to return the bottle to the manufacturer. the manufacturer cut costs and the CEO took half for his mansion and gave everyone raises with the other half. the consumer is happy because milk in a plastic bottle is .50 cheaper and they don’t have to put it outside for the milk man. just one easy example.
    A mother sues the diaper washing company for her kid getting sick from a one in a million bacteria surviving the cleaning process. and the court thinks the cleaning company is at fault and rewards the mother with more money than she could imagine and puts the company out of business. insurance rates go up for all other washing companies and they too go out of business because another company came up with a diaper which never is re used… the disposible. another easy example of how things get to where they are today. The FDA puts this kind of burden on every medical or health industry. The courts make rediculous rewards and insurance companies make rediculous money from high premiums. and costs are passed on to the consumer.

    Like

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