Remembering Canadians who fought and died in Korean War on Korean War Veterans Day

“More than 26,000 Canadians – some only teenagers, others veterans of the Second World War – crossed the Pacific Ocean to fight under the flag of the United Nations. Over 500 Canadian soldiers, sailors, and air personnel made the ultimate sacrifice, and the lives of countless others were forever changed.” – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

A Statement from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Korean War Veterans Day

Posted July 27th, 2017 on Niagara At Large

Canadian soldier during Korean War

“Today, we remember the brave members of the army, navy and air forces who fought so valiantly, and sacrificed so greatly, during the Korean War.

“Sixty-four years ago today, a ceasefire put an end to active fighting in the Korean War. After the Communist North’s invasion of South Korea in 1950, the brutal war lasted more than three years and cost hundreds of thousands of military and civilian lives. More than 26,000 Canadians – some only teenagers, others veterans of the Second World War – crossed the Pacific Ocean to fight under the flag of the United Nations. Over 500 Canadian soldiers, sailors, and air personnel made the ultimate sacrifice, and the lives of countless others were forever changed.

“The soldiers fought in conditions reminiscent of the First World War – cold, wet trench duty punctuated by terrifying night patrols into no man’s land. They bravely battled both the harsh weather and enemy forces at places like Kapyong, the site of one of Canada’s most important victories.

“We take pride in Canada’s contributions, along with those of our United Nations allies, to defending the sovereignty of South Korea. The courage and sacrifice of our Korean War veterans helped South Korea to become the peaceful and prosperous country we know today.

“Today, I urge all Canadians to learn more about the Korean War, and to participate in activities being held to honour the veterans. As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, let us recognize all those in our military, and their families who support them. They help defend our most cherished values – openness, democracy, compassion, and respect for human rights – in Canada and around the world.”

(A Brief Note from NAL publisher Doug Draper – Thoughts to all Korean War veterans on both sides of the Canada/U.S. border in our greater Niagara region. In my years as a newspaper reporter, I interviewed many veterans at Remembrance Day gatherings, and I was struck by the fact that stories Korean War veterans told me about their combat experiences were often more horrific than those told by Second World War veterans, believe it or not.

As one fortunate enough never to have been placed in their position, it is impossible to comprehend the traumatic circumstances these individuals struggled through, and continued to struggle through with the memories.

When are we humans going to stop putting ourselves through this kind of hell?)

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 “A politician thinks of the next election. A leader thinks of the next generation.” – Bernie Sanders

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One response to “Remembering Canadians who fought and died in Korean War on Korean War Veterans Day

  1. And whose idea was it for Canada to Join this UN Mission? There is another view of the Korean war which I was privileged to learn on my visit to the DPRK in August 2010.
    The South was a puppet regime that folded like a tent the minute the first shot was fired. Had the US not intervened the South’s army would have been driven into the ocean. The US intervention forced a “Strategic Retreat” by the North to prevent annihilation.
    In the end Chinese volunteers joining the North forced a negotiated settlement. Canada’s involvement in this unnecessary, brutal war is nothing to be proud of.

    Like

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