A Few Great Words Spoken On The Night American Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Was Assassinated – 45 Years Ago This April 4th

 

From Niagara At Large publisher Doug Draper

 

Forty-five years ago this Thursday, April 4, Martin Luther King was shot and killed in Memphis, Tennessee.

Robert Kennedy speaks to gathering of people in a neighbourhood in Indianapolis, Indiana on the eventing Martin Luther King was assassinated

Robert Kennedy speaks to gathering of people in a neighbourhood in Indianapolis, Indiana on the eventing Martin Luther King was assassinated

That same evening, Robert F. Kennedy, a U.S. Senator for New York, brother of the late, assassinated President John F. Kennedy and a candidate running for president on a stop-the-war-in Vietnam ticket, addressed a crowd of people in a predominantly black neighbourhood in Indianapolis, Indiana to share the terrible news.

Kennedy’s handlers urged him not to venture out that night since word of the assassination was already spreading and violence was breaking out in some cities across the country. Kennedy insisted on going anyway and the words he spoke that evening were unrehearsed and are still regarded as one of the most moving addresses delivered by a political figure on this continent in the past 50 years.

Two months later, Robert Kennedy would, himself, be assassinated after delivering another speech to campaign supporters in Los Angeles, California.

On a week when we are mourning the death of Peter Kormos, a Niagara, Ontario politician who delivered his own share of off-the-cuff addresses that stirred listeners, I am sure he would have counted this April 4, 1968 talk by Robert Kennedy as one to embrace for its call for peace and justice for all.

Here it is –

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I’m only going to talk to you just for a minute or so this evening, because I have some — some very sad news for all of you — Could you lower those signs, please? — I have some very sad news for all of you, and, I think, sad news for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world; and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and was killed tonight in Memphis, Tennessee.

Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice between fellow human beings. He died in the cause of that effort. In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it’s perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black — considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible — you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.

We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization — black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand, and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion, and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to fill with — be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.

But we have to make an effort in the United States. We have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond, or go beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poem, my — my favorite poet was Aeschylus. And he once wrote:

Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.

So I ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King — yeah, it’s true — but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love — a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.

We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times. We’ve had difficult times in the past, but we — and we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; and it’s not the end of disorder.

But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings that abide in our land.

And let’s dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.

Thank you very much.

You can watch a video of Robert Kennedy’s address by clicking on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5svX3eRyQPc .

 (Niagara At Large invites you to join in the conversation by sharing your views on the content of this post below. For reasons of transparency and promoting civil dialogue, NAL only posts comments from individuals who share their first and last name with their views.)

One response to “A Few Great Words Spoken On The Night American Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Was Assassinated – 45 Years Ago This April 4th

  1. Gail Benjafield

    I will never forget. We lived in Boston; I was expecting our first child. Came home from a Lamaze class to hear the dreadful news. Despaired. This event, being from “the one and only” [Massachusetts] ‘liberal state of that time’ made me decide to no longer stay in the U. S. When our son was born a few months later, and we spent another year in that foreign land, we returned as I did not want to be in the country that assissinated King, then Kennedy, and Nixon was rising on the horizon. Best choice we ever made. And we had choices.

    Like

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