Here Is Urging All Of Us To Help Stop The Spread Of Niagara Flu Activity At Its Peak

Submitted by Niagara, Ontario’s Public Health Department

NIAGARA REGION, Jan. 7, 2013 – The flu has arrived in Niagara with a total of 84 lab confirmed cases of Influenza A. Of those cases, 61 have been since Dec. 23, 2012. In addition, there are currently 20 institutional outbreaks, 12 of which are lab confirmed influenza outbreaks.

An image of Influenza A, an awful and potentially life-threatening flu for some, up way too close and personal. Niagara Region's Public Health department is offering tips here to keep it away.

An image of Influenza A, an awful and potentially life-threatening flu for some, up way too close and personal. Niagara Region’s Public Health department is offering tips here to keep it away.

The flu spreads easily from infected persons through coughing and sneezing, or by touching contaminated surfaces such as toys, doorknobs, eating utensils, and unwashed hands. 

Niagara Region Public Health reminds residents to take the following precautions to reduce the spread of flu:

  • Get your flu shot
  • Clean your hands regularly
  • Cough into your elbow, arm/sleeve or tissue
  • Keep your distance and avoid shaking hands and close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay home if you are ill. Public Health discourages visiting friends and family in long-term care facilities or hospitals if you are ill with the flu or have ‘flu-like’ symptoms.

 Influenza A is a respiratory illness that can infect the nose, throat and lungs. Signs can include a sudden high fever, sore throat, cough, headache, chills and extreme fatigue. Severe cases can lead to serious breathing problems.

Niagara Region Public Health tracks flu activity throughout the flu season (October to May). 

This information is found on the Niagara Region website at  www.niagararegion.ca/health  and is updated each Friday. We encourage residents and media to visit this page to track activity.

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One response to “Here Is Urging All Of Us To Help Stop The Spread Of Niagara Flu Activity At Its Peak

  1. It’s not about you! It’s about protecting your others. You may not care whether you get the flu. Even with the flu shot you may get a mild form of the disease. Without the shot you certainly increase your chances of getting sick. If you are a senior, or fall into a vulnerable group such as those with respiratory problems already, you also have a much higher risk of serious complications.
    While you may not care whether you catch the flu. I bet your neighbours care if they do. So, don’t get a flu shot for you. Get one to protect your neighbours. You may even protect the people you love (more than you, of course since you don’t care if you get the flu).
    Research is clear. Flu shots do protect vulnerable groups. They can protect you, too. They may not stop a mild case of the disease but they sure may stop serious complications and perhaps prevent death: not yours of course since you don’t care. However, you just might prevent someone you love from becoming seriously ill.
    My wife and I have had a flu shot every year since they have been given. We have yet to have a significant case of the flu, only a few common colds. At first, I didn’t want the shot either. I don’t like needles. Then I realized my getting ill may cause others to get ill, too. I care about my family, friends, and neighbours. So, I decided the price and risk was small for the vaccine’s protection. I got my first shot, my second, and so on. The rest is history. I’ve not had the flu!!
    Choose to care not about you, but do care about others. Get the shot. Gosh, the one you save may be a member of my family — ah, but, as I said, we get the flu shot at my house.

    Like

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