Brock U. Students Find Alarming Amounts Of Plastic In Sand At St. Catharines Beach

“I think much of the discussion concerning plastics in the environment has been focused on the oceans and we are quickly understanding that plastic pollution is also an important issue closer to home in the Great Lakes.” – Professor of Geography and Tourism Studies Michael Pisaric, Brock University

News from Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario

Posted January 22nd, 2020 on Niagara At Large

A collection of plastics picked up on Sunset Beach in St. Catharines in October, 2019. Photo courtesy of Brock University

Niagara, Ontario – A day at the beach doesn’t often involve lab work, but for a group of Brock University fourth-year Geography students tasked with assessing plastic waste on the shores of Lake Ontario last fall, it was just that.

Back in October (2019), students from Professor of Geography and Tourism Studies Michael Pisaric’s GEOG 4P26 class visited Sunset Beach in north St. Catharines to measure the quantity of plastics turning up in the sand.

Students measured out plots on the beach and sifted through the sand to collect as many tiny pieces of plastic as they could. They compiled their findings in lab reports for the end of the Fall Term.

The results are now in, and they’re alarming.

In one sample alone, one square metre of the beach yielded 665 individual pieces of plastic material.

Pisaric called the amount and variety of plastics collected in the samples “striking.”

“I think much of the discussion concerning plastics in the environment has been focused on the oceans and we are quickly understanding that plastic pollution is also an important issue closer to home in the Great Lakes,” said Pisaric, who is also Chair of the Geography and Tourism Studies Department.

Emily Bowyer, Pravin Rajayagam and Dakota Schnierle, students in a fourth-year Geography course at Brock, sift through sand on Sunset Beach in St. Catharines to find out how many microplastics are washing up on the beach. Photo courtesy of  Brock U.

“This small study of a single beach on Lake Ontario clearly shows the prevalence of plastic pollution in our own backyard is a serious problem.”

Emily Bowyer, a third-year student from Mississauga majoring in Geography and Biology who participated in the field collection, described it as “an opportunity to see the magnitude of the problems in the environment first-hand.”

Another surprise to the team was the prevalence of nurdles — small plastic pellets used in the manufacture of many different goods.

A poster produced by the American-based environmental group, Alliance for the Great Lakes, in 2017. This image inserted in this post by Niagara At Large

Investigation during the course uncovered a 2013 Toronto Star article that suggested nurdles may have made their way into Lake Ontario via the Humber River during a factory fire.

“It is interesting to speculate that the prevalence of nurdles we noted in our samples may have originated on the other side of Lake Ontario,” Pisaric said.

The professor plans to run a similar investigation when the course is offered again next fall to address some of the questions that cropped up in light of the results of the students’ labs.

“Perhaps next time around I will have the students compare the beaches on Lake Ontario with a beach on Lake Erie,” he said. “Are similar quantities of plastics occurring in both areas? Do the types of plastic differ between the two lake environments?”

Carolyn Finlayson, Experiential Education Co-ordinator for the Faculty of Social Sciences, attended the field trip and witnessed how interested casual beach visitors were in the students’ activities.

“It’s a wonderful example of the larger impact experiential learning can have on our Niagara community and our students,” she said. “By working at the beach that day for their lab, students were able to start conversations with beachgoers about their use of plastic and its impact on the shorelines they enjoy.”

Cara Krezek, Director of Co-op, Career and Experiential Education, said these were exactly the types of courses the University envisioned when it committed to expanding experiential learning so all students had access to meaningful experiences in their programs.

A sample of the “alarming” amount of plastic pollution Brock researchers found on a beach along Lake Ontario in St. Catharines,

“Courses like these take our students into a real-world setting and allow them to apply their knowledge, learn new skills and reflect on how they can take these experiences forward to a future career path,” Krezek said. “I am certain these students will never forget their findings and it will change the way they interact with plastics.”

A Brief Footnote from Doug Draper at Niagara At Large – Thank you to Brock University in St. Catharines/Niagara for supporting this professor and these students in carrying out important research for the greater good of us all. This is the kind of research our universities and colleges can and should do with the resources available to them. 

Gathering and sharing information that communities can use to improve the quality of our lives can and should be a major role that our schools of learning play.

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For More News And Commentary From Niagara At Large – An independent, alternative voice for our greater bi-national Niagara Region – become a regular visitor and subscriber to NAL at www.niagaraatlarge.com .

“A Politician Thinks Of The Next Election. A Leader Thinks Of The Next Generation.” – Bernie Sanders

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