Ontario Government Invites Public Input on Reducing Litter and Waste

Ontario Environment Minister Rod Phillips

“Litter-reduction efforts will hinge on fostering a greater sense of personal responsibility for the people of Ontario and, in particular, our youth. … It begins with recognizing that real environmentalism involves more than just the social media of activists and celebrities but is instead founded on the personal decisions each of us make in our day-to-day lives.”                           – Rod Phillips, Ontario Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks

A Call-Out from Ontario’s Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks

Posted March 6th, 2019 on Niagara At Large

Ontario’s government is working for the people to keep our province clean and beautiful for generations to come by taking steps to reduce litter and waste in our communities and increase and improve household recycling, as committed to in our environment plan.

The province is inviting public feedback on proposals to reduce plastic litter and waste in our neighbourhoods and parks, divert and reduce food and organic waste from households and businesses, and increase opportunities for the people of Ontario to participate in waste reduction efforts.

A discussion paper has been posted on the Environment Registry for a 45-day period.

This March 6th, Rod Phillips, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks, addressed the Ontario Waste Management Association (OWMA) Annual General Meeting, outlining the release of the paper and highlighting the importance of ongoing collaboration and consultation with municipalities to ensure our waste reduction and diversion goals are achieved.

“We know that Ontarians want to do their part to reduce litter and waste, whether at home, at work or on the go,” said Phillips. “There are so many great ideas out there in the province that we want to build on to reduce waste, divert more of it away from landfills and get our diversion rate moving in the right direction again.”

Ontario is also committed to making producers responsible for the waste generated by their products and packaging, encouraging them to find new and innovative cost-effective ways to recycle their products and lower costs for consumers. The transition to extended producer responsibility will increase the amount of household material recycled, while shifting the cost of recycling from municipalities – and taxpayers – to producers.

“Litter-reduction efforts will hinge on fostering a greater sense of personal responsibility for the people of Ontario and, in particular, our youth,” said Phillips. “It begins with recognizing that real environmentalism involves more than just the social media of activists and celebrities but is instead founded on the personal decisions each of us make in our day-to-day lives.”

By making a concerted effort to show civic responsibility through our commitment to reduce waste and litter, we can all make a lasting difference in ensuring Ontario’s environment is protected for generations to come. 

This is the latest step in part of the government’s made-in-Ontario environment plan to protect our air, land and water, prevent and reduce litter and waste, support Ontarians to continue to do their share to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and help communities and families increase their resilience to climate change.

The plan will help protect the Ontario we know and love, ensuring that its pristine beauties and strong communities can be enjoyed now and in the future.

QUICK FACTS

  • Ontario generates nearly a tonne of waste per person each year.
  • Our diversion rate has stalled at 30 per cent over the past 15 years, meaning 70 per cent of our waste materials continue to end up in landfills.
  • A total of 60 per cent of food and organic waste in Ontario is sent to landfill, emitting methane – a potent greenhouse gas – when it decomposes.
  • Every 1,000 tonnes of waste diverted from landfill generates seven full-time jobs and $360,000 in wages, as well as totaling more than $700,000 in Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Learn more about how Ontario aims to reduce waste across the province and how you can help

NIAGARA AT LARGE encourages you to join the conversation by sharing your views on this post in the space following the Bernie Sanders quote below.

A reminder that we only post comments by individuals who also share their first and last names.

For more news and commentary from Niagara At Large – an independent, alternative voice for our greater bi-national Niagara region – become a regular visitor and subscriber to NAL at www.niagaraatlarge.com .

“A politician thinks of the next election. A leader thinks of the next generation.” – Bernie Sanders

2 responses to “Ontario Government Invites Public Input on Reducing Litter and Waste

  1. Reduce litter by doing what I do. Don’t litter and if you drop a piece of paper, wrapper or paper cup and the wind blows it. Run after the litter until you grab it and dispose it properly. Or ban concerts and rallies in parks. Or surround said park with barricades and police and no one leaves until the park is clean. I prefer using my personal system. Thank you

    Like

  2. My response to ‘Reducing Litter and Waste’:

    https://ero.ontario.ca/comment/reply/node/606/comment

    I heartily support your governments efforts to reduce litter and waste.

    Litter is an eye sore which under-minds the tourism industry (after all, why would visitors want to visit an attraction/area which has volumes of litter strewn about?) which the Niagara Region, of which I am a resident, depends on to a large degree.

    Litter also detracts from local residents quality of life and under-minds efforts to recycle waste.

    I have read that cigarette butts compose up to 50% of litter by weight. Because they have a high composition of plastic, they do not bio-degrade and instead persist in the environment.

    I think that your government needs to pressure the tobacco companies to develop and make exclusively available a fully biodegradable filter within the next couple of years.

    Another option which is both environmentally sound and would reduce waste is for re-useable cigarette holders to be made available for sale. These could even be manufactured from recycled plastic which would create a double win for the environment

    Thank you for this opportunity,
    Susan Corcoran

    Like

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