A Tribute to Canadians who Liberated the Netherlands 75 Years Ago

Canadians greeted with jubilation as Netherlands is liberated from Nazis 75 years ago this May 5th

“On this day 75 years ago today, Canadians accepted the surrender of German forces in the Netherlands, marking the end of the suffering of the Dutch people, who had endured years of unspeakable cruelty, misery, and hunger.”                                                – Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

A Statement by the Canada’s Prime Minister on the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands

Posted May 5th, 2020 on Niagara At Large

Ottawa, Ontario – The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, issued the following statement today on the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands:

“Today, on the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands, we honour the incredible courage and sacrifices of the Canadians and Newfoundlanders who fought, and those who gave their lives, to liberate the Netherlands from the tyranny of Nazi Germany.

“The campaign to liberate the Netherlands saw two Canadian army corps fighting together for the first time. Led by Lieutenant-General Charles Foulkes, members of the 1st Canadian Corps fought alongside members of the 2nd Canadian Corps, led by Lieutenant-General Guy Simonds.

Both groups battled through the country’s villages, cities, canals, and farmlands to drive out the occupying Nazi forces.

Relieved Dutch citizens cheered on the Canadian troops as they welcomed their newfound freedom.

“On this day 75 years ago today, Canadians accepted the surrender of German forces in the Netherlands, marking the end of the suffering of the Dutch people, who had endured years of unspeakable cruelty, misery, and hunger.

“The Liberation of the Netherlands was Canada’s last major contribution to the Allied victory in Europe. But this great victory came at a terrible cost. Of the 175,000 Canadian soldiers who participated in the eight-month campaign, more than 7,600 died.

Canadians cheered on as heroes, 75 years ago in the Netherlands

“We still remember the close ties forged in war, and celebrate the special bond between our two countries, as we continue to promote our common goals of peace, freedom, and security. Each year, this friendship blooms anew in the colourful tulips of Ottawa, donated by the Dutch Royal family after the war as a gesture of eternal gratitude.

“While this year’s commemorative ceremonies have moved online due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, I invite all Canadians to pay tribute to the courage and sacrifice of those who fought in the Netherlands during the Second World War. We remain forever in their debt.

“Lest we forget.”

NIAGARA AT LARGE encourages you to join the conversation by sharing your views on this post in the space following the Bernie Sanders quote below.

“A Politician Thinks Of The Next Election. A Leader Thinks Of The Next Generation.” – Bernie Sanders

One response to “A Tribute to Canadians who Liberated the Netherlands 75 Years Ago

  1. Linda McKellar

    A dear late friend, Douglas Peeler from Welland, volunteered although he was under age and fought to liberate the Netherlands. He was a big, cheerful man and in his later years with his white hair and beard he looked like a jolly Santa Claus. Decades after the war a citizen he met there located him, invited him back and he took part in a parade as the star attraction leading the parade in a Jeep. He was featured in newspapers there and his wife has the photos and clippings.

    One evening I was hosting Doug, his wife and another couple for dinner and he said about that honor, “I must have done something good”. INDEED!
    The other couple was originally from Holland. Jan was a child during the war and suffered greatly to the point of starvation. When the two men came together that evening, finding kindred souls, stories came out that they had never shared with anyone, astounding their wives! We spoiled Canadians from later generations cannot imagine what those soldiers and civilians suffered.

    I lost a cousin at Buron, Garnett Trimble from Guelph, fighting with the HLI during 1944. He is buried at Beny Sur Mer. Two other cousins were in the same battle.

    The Netherlands and Canada will always have a special bond. Canadians are thankful that they still remember what our fathers and grandfathers did and we must remember as well, including those who never came back. It would be wonderful if others shared their stories here.

    Like

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